Labrador

Stamford and Morrisey the LabraforsKnow your Breed: Labrador

A more sweet-natured dog it would be hard to find! The Labrador is the most even tempered of dogs and, despite its size, can be the perfect house dog even with young children around. In fact the whole family will enjoy the adventure, watching him grow from puppy to young dog to adult. His antics and natural playfulness cannot fail to delight young or old. The downside of that though is that this breed of dog probably never grows up properly. By that I mean that he never forgets he was once a playful pup and, while that is an endearing quality in a young dog, it can be a bit tiresome as your pet gets older. Think of the film Marley and Me and there you have your typical, ill-disciplined Labrador!

It doesn’t have to be that way though as, with proper puppy training and beyond, this dog can be the perfect choice as a family pet. A fully grown Labrador is a strong, sturdy animal and you don’t really need him pulling on the lead or jumping up at people just to show how friendly he is. Unfortunately, unless very well trained from an early age, this will be how he is. It is the natural instinct of this breed of dog to be highly sociable with both people and other dogs and there are times when this attitude will get him into trouble, especially if coming across a more aggressive breed.

His friendly tail wagging and sniffing antics are not very likely to go down well with a grumpy Doberman (for example). He is liable to get his ear chewed off (literally) if he gets too close. This is the unfortunate side of this breed of dog – if anything he is TOO friendly for his own good sometimes. But, with care, it is possible to keep him safe and happy and this really is the kind of dog that is a delight to work with. He is eager to please his master; he will generally come when called (unless absorbed in the company of his friends of course!) and is always hungry. Literally, ALWAYS hungry! This trait is useful during training of course because it is easy to bribe him with little titbits – he will probably do anything for a little more food.

In short, the average black, chocolate brown or golden Labrador is an affable, lovable, loyal dog that will delight anyone who has the good fortune to own one. Unusually this breed of dog is equally happy as a house dog or a working dog – they make excellent gun dogs for example. He should enjoy good health over an average lifetime beyond ten years although, in later years, they can suffer at the rear end from joint degeneration. Like older people needing hip replacements, the Labrador suffers in a similar way. The bottom line is that owners need to be careful not to allow this dog to overeat as weight problems only exacerbate the aforementioned joint problem. Plenty of exercise will help of course.

 

The Kennel club description can be found here

Know your Breed: Labrador

Stamford and Morrisey the LabraforsA more sweet-natured dog it would be hard to find!  The Labrador is the most even tempered of dogs and, despite its size, can be the perfect house dog even with young children around.  In fact the whole family will enjoy the adventure, watching him grow from puppy to young dog to adult.  His antics and natural playfulness cannot fail to delight young or old.  The downside of that though is that this breed of dog probably never grows up properly.  By that I mean that he never forgets he was once a playful pup and, while that is an endearing quality in a young dog, it can be a bit tiresome as your pet gets older.  Think of the film Marley and Me and there you have your typical, ill-disciplined Labrador!

It doesn’t have to be that way though as, with proper puppy training and beyond, this dog can be the perfect choice as a family pet.  A fully grown Labrador is a strong, sturdy animal and you don’t really need him pulling on the lead or jumping up at people just to show how friendly he is.  Unfortunately, unless very well trained from an early age, this will be how he is.  It is the natural instinct of this breed of dog to be highly sociable with both people and other dogs and there are times when this attitude will get him into trouble, especially if coming across a more aggressive breed.

His friendly tail wagging and sniffing antics are not very likely to go down well with a grumpy Doberman (for example).  He is liable to get his ear chewed off (literally) if he gets too close.  This is the unfortunate side of this breed of dog – if anything he is TOO friendly for his own good sometimes.  But, with care, it is possible to keep him safe and happy and this really is the kind of dog that is a delight to work with.  He is eager to please his master; he will generally come when called (unless absorbed in the company of his friends of course!) and is always hungry.  Literally, ALWAYS hungry!  This trait is useful during training of course because it is easy to bribe him with little titbits – he will probably do anything for a little more food.

In short, the average black, chocolate brown or golden Labrador is an affable, lovable, loyal dog that will delight anyone who has the good fortune to own one.  Unusually this breed of dog is equally happy as a house dog or a working dog – they make excellent gun dogs for example. He should enjoy good health over an average lifetime beyond ten years although, in later years, they can suffer at the rear end from joint degeneration.  Like older people needing hip replacements, the Labrador suffers in a similar way.  The bottom line is that owners need to be careful not to allow this dog to overeat as weight problems only exacerbate the aforementioned joint problem.  Plenty of exercise will help of course.

 

The Kennel club description can be found here