Pinch / Prong collars – the truth about them and their use.

Pinch collar

dog_prong_collar-730053So exactly what is a pinch or prong collar? Quite simply, prong collars are an aversive device that will cause pain to your dog. The pinch or prong collar is made of interlocking links of metal, each with two blunt prongs that pinch the dog’s skin when the collar is tightened.

It feels just like you would pinch your own skin.These collars are designed to punish dogs for pulling by inflicting pain and discomfort and they can cause serious physical and emotional damage to dogs and should never be used.

Does this sound like the sort of thing you want to inflict on your dog?

ban pinch/prong collars

The metal spikes pinch the skin around dogs’ necks when they pull and can scratch or puncture them.

Prong collars are a quick fix and will not teach the dog not to pull or lunge on the lead.

Dogs may well interpret the tightening of a prong collar around their neck as a stranglehold (which it is, after all!) and become fearful or even aggressive.

Some people will even try to hide the fact that they are using this piece of equipment and buy covers for them!!

Almost without exception, physical punishment, including the use of prong collars and electric shock collars, alpha rolls. Owners should be discouraged from using these techniques and any trainers that use these techniques should be boycotted.

Pain tends to increase aggression. For dog-aggressive dogs, any pain in the neck can trigger the same fight response as would be triggered by being bitten in the neck by the other dog. So use of neck pain to a dog who is dog aggressive is likely to cause the dog to start a fight as a pre-emptive strike under less and less provocation from the other dog.

It is time that these collars are banned and can no longer be bought by people to harm their dogs.

Finchley Dog Walker will NOT use such devices and  a flat collar and/or harness with lead must be supplied

 


Related Links

http://blogs.rspca.org.uk/insights/2014/04/01/pinch-collars-and-why-they-can-compromise-dog-welfare/#.Uz0ualeBem3

http://www.dogstrust.org.uk/mediacentre/newsreleases/pr14prongcollars.aspx#.Uz0iLleBem0